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PostPosted: November 5th, 2019, 10:52 am 
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tomp wrote:
If you have the proper crimper, crimping is a much better solution than soldering. I worked at Colortran where we did lighting for large TV and motion picture studios. We had power feeds with wire sizes up to 500mcm (handling 400 amps) and always crimped. Crimping makes a better longer lasting connection but you must have the proper tools. A major problem with soldering wire ends that will go into screw terminals is the the solder is softer than the copper. After a while the soft solder allows the copper to re-orient itself in the connector and they become loose.


And why not do both? I crimp then I flood the crimped connection with solder. The best of both worlds -- solid stable connection and low contact resistance.

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PostPosted: November 5th, 2019, 10:58 am 
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HAL wrote:
I used 8 awg wire lugs and just cut out the top of the ring to make a spade. Just screw down the wire in the terminal. Just make sure to retighten it multliple times from cold flow. Lowes or electrical stores stock them.

https://www.lowes.com/pd/Blackburn-2-Co ... gs/4582297


I have used these as well with no issues. Note that these are copper, most made for audio connectors are brass.


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PostPosted: November 5th, 2019, 10:59 am 
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Only person I know using wire that large is Charlie. I believe he bought battery lugs and then cut open the ends to make a spade. It's Copper, so simple tools and files will get you there.

If you purchase them at a West Marine store, you can take your wire with you and they will crimp them for you. They also sell heat shrink to install over the connection.

https://www.ancorproducts.com/en/252234


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PostPosted: November 5th, 2019, 11:54 am 
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SoundMods wrote:
tomp wrote:
If you have the proper crimper, crimping is a much better solution than soldering. I worked at Colortran where we did lighting for large TV and motion picture studios. We had power feeds with wire sizes up to 500mcm (handling 400 amps) and always crimped. Crimping makes a better longer lasting connection but you must have the proper tools. A major problem with soldering wire ends that will go into screw terminals is the the solder is softer than the copper. After a while the soft solder allows the copper to re-orient itself in the connector and they become loose.


And why not do both? I crimp then I flood the crimped connection with solder. The best of both worlds -- solid stable connection and low contact resistance.

If you properly crimp there is no advantage to the solder. I have cut some of the large lugs that were crimped on to the 500mcm wire and the surface was just one solid piece of copper so number one the solder could not even flow to where the crimp was and second heating to add the solder can cause the copper to flow. Up to each individual but I have never had a problem with a properly crimped connection.


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PostPosted: November 5th, 2019, 12:15 pm 
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It is 8 gauge speaker wire. Two wires twisted in a sleeve.


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PostPosted: November 5th, 2019, 12:16 pm 
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And why not do both? I crimp then I flood the crimped connection with solder. The best of both worlds -- solid stable connection and low contact resistance.[/quote]
If you properly crimp there is no advantage to the solder. I have cut some of the large lugs that were crimped on to the 500mcm wire and the surface was just one solid piece of copper so number one the solder could not even flow to where the crimp was and second heating to add the solder can cause the copper to flow. Up to each individual but I have never had a problem with a properly crimped connection.[/quote]

Tom:

Aren't you being a bit silly comparing 500mcm (almost 3/4-inch diameter) to audio-speaker wiring that runs from 18-gage (about 1/25-inch diameter) to say 8-gage (about 1/10-inch diameter?

That's like comparing a 3/4-inch diameter water pipe in your home to a 10-inch street main. :crazy:

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PostPosted: November 5th, 2019, 12:24 pm 
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It's pretty well documented that crimp connections are superior to solder. If done properly, there is no room for solder to wick into the connection. Given that most people do not have the proper crimp tool for the connector they are using solder may help. However, if I crimp, I do not solder, correct tool or not.


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PostPosted: November 5th, 2019, 12:29 pm 
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DaveR wrote:
It's pretty well documented that crimp connections are superior to solder. If done properly, there is no room for solder to wick into the connection. Given that most people do not have the proper crimp tool for the connector they are using solder may help. However, if I crimp, I do not solder, correct tool or not.


Actually there is a lot of room around the connection to fill with solder. Any exposed part of the crimped wire is included in the connection providing the lowest possible connection resistance due to the greater amount of connection surface in play.

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PostPosted: November 5th, 2019, 12:37 pm 
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Can we find the parts first, then we can argue about method? It is 8 gauge wire. There should be some type of option that will work without having to go overboard modding it.


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PostPosted: November 5th, 2019, 12:45 pm 
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Google.


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